Rhodes Must Fall: How black women claimed their place

When the Rhodes Must Fall movement began UCT feminists quickly called a meeting with its leadership. They were not going to let their voices be drowned out.

After the movement’s first meeting, myself and a small group of black, radical feminists decided that we needed to stake our claim in talks about the university and its institutional racism. We began speaking up at meetings about what it means to be a black women or LGTBQIA people in an institution that still celebrates misogyny and white supremacy symbolically with the statue of Cecil John Rhodes statue. We knew how easily patriarchy can dominate any context, even protests about equal rights, and they were not going to let the Rhodes Must Fall movement become one of them.

We were not going to let only men lead the movement.

Read it at the M&G.

Image – M&G